Case studies

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GRAMEEN DANONE FOOD LIMITED (A): Creating a social business in Bangladesh

Frederic DALSACE, B. GARRETTE, J.-L. ARDOIN, B. FAIVRE TAVIGNOT

2012

The cases examine how Danone, the leading French food company, and Grameen, Mohammed Yunus' organization, built Grameen Danone Food Limited (GDFL), the first "Social Business" ever co-developed according to the 2006 Nobel Prize winner principles
During an informal lunch with Mohammed Yunus, Danone CEO's Franck Riboud agreed to form a Social Business (SB) in order to fight children's malnutrition in Bangladesh. This hand-shake resulted in the construction of a small plant in Bogra, designed to produce "shokti-doi", yoghurt specifically developed for Bangladesh. The development of such a new organizational form is far from being smooth, however, raising legitimate questions about its true potential as a way to alleviate poverty. Although no definitive answer can be provided at this stage, the case series provide instructors with enough details to illustrate the pros and cons of social businesses. More fundamentally, the series examine the use of market-based solutions to fight poverty and illustrate how firms exercise their Corporate Social Responsibility (CSR).
Case A is positioned in December 2008, at a time when GDFL's model is clearly not performing. It gives an historical perspective on the joint-venture, and underlines the tension between the business' social and the economic aspects.
Cases B and C are short follow-up cases designed to be distributed in class.

Keywords: Food company, poverty, nutritious food, social business, ethics, corporate social responsibility, marketing, corporate alliance, Bangladesh.

GRAMEEN DANONE FOOD LIMITED (B): New Directions

Jean-Loup ARDOIN, F. DALSACE, B. GARRETTE, B. FAIVRE TAVIGNOT

2012

The cases examine how Danone, the leading French food company, and Grameen, Mohammed Yunus' organization, built Grameen Danone Food Limited (GDFL), the first "Social Business" ever co-developed according to the 2006 Nobel Prize winner principles.
During an informal lunch with Mohammed Yunus, Danone CEO's Franck Riboud agreed to form a Social Business (SB) in order to fight children's malnutrition in Bangladesh. This hand-shake resulted in the construction of a small plant in Bogra, designed to produce "shokti-doi", yoghurt specifically developed for Bangladesh. The development of such a new organizational form is far from being smooth, however, raising legitimate questions about its true potential as a way to alleviate poverty. Although no definitive answer can be provided at this stage, the case series provide instructors with enough details to illustrate the pros and cons of social businesses. More fundamentally, the series examine the use of market-based solutions to fight poverty and illustrate how firms exercise their Corporate Social Responsibility (CSR).
Case A is positioned in December 2008, at a time when GDFL's model is clearly not performing. It gives an historical perspective on the joint-venture, and underlines the tension between the business' social and the economic aspects.
Cases B and C are short follow-up cases designed to be distributed in class.

Keywords: Food company, poverty, nutritious food, social business, ethics, corporate social responsibility, marketing, corporate alliance, Bangladesh.

GRAMEEN DANONE FOOD LIMITED (C): Update

Jean-Loup ARDOIN, F. DALSACE, B. GARRETTE, B. FAIVRE TAVIGNOT

2012

The cases examine how Danone, the leading French food company, and Grameen, Mohammed Yunus' organization, built Grameen Danone Food Limited (GDFL), the first "Social Business" ever co-developed according to the 2006 Nobel Prize winner principles.
During an informal lunch with Mohammed Yunus, Danone CEO's Franck Riboud agreed to form a Social Business (SB) in order to fight children's malnutrition in Bangladesh. This hand-shake resulted in the construction of a small plant in Bogra, designed to produce "shokti-doi", yoghurt specifically developed for Bangladesh. The development of such a new organizational form is far from being smooth, however, raising legitimate questions about its true potential as a way to alleviate poverty. Although no definitive answer can be provided at this stage, the case series provide instructors with enough details to illustrate the pros and cons of social businesses. More fundamentally, the series examine the use of market-based solutions to fight poverty and illustrate how firms exercise their Corporate Social Responsibility (CSR).
Case A is positioned in December 2008, at a time when GDFL's model is clearly not performing. It gives an historical perspective on the joint-venture, and underlines the tension between the business' social and the economic aspects.
Cases B and C are short follow-up cases designed to be distributed in class.

Keywords: Food company, poverty, nutritious food, social business, ethics, corporate social responsibility, marketing, corporate alliance, Bangladesh.

Is the LYDEC experience replicable?

R. DURAND, A. JACQUEMINET, S. TOUBOUL

2012

This case describes how a services’ provider, LYDEC, entered the BoP market of Casablanca shanty towns step-by-step. First LYDEC entered as a sole player from 1997, which due to ill-adapted services and unreliable processes revealed to be an extremely costly initiative; then with government and local authorities support from 2005. In the second period, the strong public-private partnership enabled a better adaptation to customers’ need, a higher operational efficiency and limited investment costs. While GDF-Suez is nowadays envisaging replicating the initiative in other developing countries, students are asked to reflect on key success factors of the Moroccan initiative, ones that could be replicated, and issues that could arise in other institutional frameworks.

Keywords: Bottom of the Pyramid, Essential Services, Public Private Partnerships, Scalability, Replicability

Un nouvel envol pour Loiseau: du décès du chef au renouveau

T. PARIS, F. LEROY

2012

The “gastronomic” company Groupe Bernard Loiseau was managed by its founder, manager and Chef from the very beginning. The total size of the group was one hundred employees, 4 restaurants.
After Bernard Loiseau’s death in February 2003, the company lost its charismatic leader as well as its expert. The consequent restructuring was aimed as going from a very centralized structure to a more functional organizational structure.
Moreover, the company was supposed to reorganize its creative mood by hiring a new chef in the spirit of Loiseau, keeping its 3 stars in the Michelin Guide. This renewal was aimed also at defining what was Loiseau’s spirit and creating an atmosphere for innovation to keep clients coming without betraying the clients’ expectations.

Keywords: Cas transversal , Gastronomie , Luxe , Création , Organisation et structure , Vision du dirigeant , Leadership , Conduite du changement , Transmission d'entreprise , Formalisation des processus , Actifs stratégiques , Image de marque , Crise , Positionnement stratégique , Réorganisation , Préservation des compétences , Restauration


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