Seminars

Indecision and the Construction of Self

Management & Human Resources

Speaker: Daniel NEWARK
University of Southern Denmark

1 December 2015 - T041 - From 1:45 pm to 3:15 pm

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Personal Initiative Training: Theory, Empirical Evidence, and Where to Go

Management & Human Resources

Speaker: Michael FRESE
National University of Singapore, Business School and Leuphana University of Lueneburg, Germany

12 October 2018 - T201 - From 1:30 pm to 3:00 pm

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The Visual Judgment of Performance

Management & Human Resources

Speaker: Chia-Jung TSAY
UCL School of Management

5 October 2018 - Bernard Ramanantsoa room - From 10:00 am to 11:30 am


Social judgments and impressions are often made on the basis of minimal information. In the domain of music, people consistently report that the most important source of information in evaluating performance is sound; nonetheless, a first set of experiments demonstrated that people actually rely on visual information when making judgments about music performance. These findings were extended through additional sets of studies elaborating on the generalizability and persistence of these effects, such as in the judgment of entrepreneurial pitch competitions, analyst forecasts of firm performance, and in service operations in the food industry. Works in progress discuss the role of expertise in decision making and implications for organizational performance.

Physical Attractiveness in the Workplace

Management & Human Resources

Speaker: Margaret Lee
London Business School

11 December 2017 - Bernard Ramanantsoa room - From 2:00 pm to 3:30 pm


Work in psychology and economics documents a robust attractiveness bias: People tend to attribute positive qualities and give better outcomes to attractive individuals. Research shows this bias exists in workplace-relevant decisions such as selection decisions, performance evaluations, and wages. However, much of this research is surprisingly lacking consideration for the organizational context. I present two projects that each examine a contextual factor that improves our understanding of how the attractiveness bias affects workplace behavior and outcomes. In the first, I present studies that show that when hiring for jobs that are considered to be relatively less desirable, the attractiveness bias is reversed such that selectors are more likely to hire a less attractive candidate. In the second project, I present evidence that shows that an additional path to advantage in organizations for attractive individuals is through their better interactions with coworkers. I propose that attractive individuals receive more help from their coworkers, which in turn positively affects their performance and outcomes. In all, this research highlights that well-established general conclusions from social psychology might change when we take organizational contexts into account.

When Two Heads Are Worse than One: Understanding the Costs of Co-Leadership

Management & Human Resources

Speaker: Frederic Godart
INSEAD

7 November 2017 - Bernard Ramanantsoa room - From 10:45 am to 12:15 pm


The present research examined the effectiveness of co-leadership, a situation where two individuals jointly occupy the same formally assigned role at the top of a hierarchy. We integrate insights from the social hierarchy and leadership literatures to present the Social Hierarchy Model of Co-Leadership. This model proposes that co-leadership generally hurts team performance because co-led teams are more likely than solo-led teams to suffer from coordination and conflict problems. However, our model also proposes that when the co-leaders have a strong relationship, this underperformance will disappear. Four studies using qualitative, experimental, and archival data support this model. Our qualitative study established the prevalence of co-leadership configurations and how co-leaders affect team processes and performance. Our experiment established causality: teams randomly assigned to have co-leaders were less creative than solo-lead teams. Archival analyses of mountaineering expeditions replicated the negative effects of co-leadership: co-led teams were more likely to experience a fatality than solo-led teams. Additional archival analyses of high-end fashion design teams replicated the negative effects of co-leadership and found that co-leadership no longer hurt creativity when the co-leaders were co-founders of their firm. The current data and the Social Hierarchy Model of Co-Leadership offer numerous theoretical and practical implications.

What’s in a frame? An in-depth exploration of the role of framing in fostering collaboration in the context of two environmental non-profits

Management & Human Resources

Speaker: Simona GIORGI
Carroll School of Management, Boston College

18 October 2017 - Bernard Ramanantsoa room - From 10:45 am to 12:15 pm


This study examines the role of framing in fostering a collaborative agreement between two environmental non-profits in the U.S. that aimed at saving a particular type of natural ecosystems, wetlands. Building on 87 interviews, 17 months of participant observation, and extensive archival data, I show that framing can be a double-edged sword that can promote, but also hinder collaboration between seemingly compatible organizations. Unlike previous work that focused on instances of success and portrayed framing as a strategic tool for persuading others, my analysis documents how framing initially resonated with what the intended recipient valued, but over time revealed a deeper-seated cultural difference in how such value was constructed. More specifically, differences in orders of worth, or principles used to construct the value of nature – either as something worthy per se or for the exchange and use value of its services – prevented collaboration between the two organizations. These findings shed light on the underpinnings of framing resonance, highlighting the complex cultural basis of inter-organizational collaboration.

Contacts  

Management & Human Resources Department  

Campus HEC Paris
1, rue de la Libération
78351 Jouy-en-Josas cedex
France

Featured Faculty  

Nathalie LUGAGNE

Management and Human Resources

Consult résumé

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