Articles

Attention, Information Processing and Choice in Incentive-Aligned Choice Experiments

L. C. YANG, O. TOUBIA, M. G. DE JONG

Journal of Marketing Research

Forthcoming

Departments: Marketing

Keywords: incentive alignment, choice experiments, preference measurement, eye tracking

https://papers.ssrn.com/sol3/papers.cfm?abstract_id=2675167


In incentive-alignment choice experiments, each decision is realized with some prob- ability prob < 1. Incentive alignment induces truth telling, i.e., respondents do not consciously lie, given the information they have processed. However, based on the psychological distance literature and the bounded rationality literature, we predict that prob < 1 is not necessarily enough to induce consumers to process information and choose as they would if choices were realized with certainty (prob = 1). In three eye tracking experiments, we vary the probability prob that choices will be realized, from 0 to 1, and study the impact on attention, information processing, and choice. Consistent with our hypotheses, we find that as prob is increased from 0 to 1, consumers: process the choice-relevant information more carefully and in a way that is more consistent with a compensatory decision process; become less novelty seeking; become more price sensitive. These findings have implications for the ecological validity of incentive-aligned preference measurement surveys. While it is not feasible to systematically use questions with high prob in the eld, we further predict and find that placing a higher-probability question (such as an external validity task) at the beginning rather than the end of a questionnaire has a desirable carryover effect on attention, information processing and choice throughout the questionnaire

The Impact of Religiosity and Culture on Salesperson Job Satisfaction and Performance

V. ONYEMAH, D. ROUZIES, D. IACOBUCCI

International Journal of Cross Cultural Management

Forthcoming

Departments: Marketing, GREGHEC (CNRS)


Understanding emerging adults' consumption of TV series in the digital age: A practice-theory-based approach

S. FEIEREISEN, D. RASOLOFOARISON, K. DE VALCK, J. SCHMITT

Journal of Business Research

Forthcoming

Departments: Marketing, GREGHEC (CNRS)

Keywords: Television seriesEmerging adultsDigital networkPractice theoryIn-depth interviews

https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0148296318304016


The present research investigates how traditional roles of television (TV) in structuring consumers' everyday lives and fostering social relationships change when emerging adults switch to the digital (i.e., non-linear) network, as well as how they experience these changes. We use a practice-theory-based lens to explore (1) how switching to the digital network triggers misalignments in emerging adults' TV series viewing practice configurations, and (2) how they address these threats to the smooth performance of their practice triad. Through in-depth interviews, we identify key tensions stemming from emerging adults' experienced loss of structure and consumption sociality. Further, we delineate the realignment strategies consumers employ to stabilize their practice triad. The present research expands the current understanding of the role of TV in structuring the fabric of consumers' lives and nurturing social bonds in the digital age

An Integrative Model of the Influence of Parental and Peer Support on Consumer Ethical Beliefs: The Mediating Role of Self-Esteem, Power and Materialism

E. GENTINA, L. SHRUM, T. LOWREY, S. VITELL, G. ROSE

Journal of Business Ethics

July 2018, vol. 150, n°4, pp.1173-1186

Departments: Marketing, GREGHEC (CNRS)

Keywords: Ethics, Adolescent consumers, Materialism, Self-esteem, Power, Peer support, Parental support

https://link.springer.com/article/10.1007/s10551-016-3137-3


What causes adolescents to develop consumer’ ethipatterns of parent–child interactions to explain risky and unethical consumer behaviors. We take a different perspective by focusing on the positive support of parents and peers in adolescent social development. An integrative model is developed that links parental and peer support with adolescents’ self-worth motives, their materialistic tendencies, and their consumer ethical beliefs. In a study of 984 adolescents, we demonstrate support for a sequential mediation model in which peer and parental support is positively related to adolescents’ self-esteem and feelings of power, which are each associated with decreased materialism as a means of compensating for low self-worth. This reduced materialism is, in turn, associated with more etcal beliefs? Prior research has largely focused on the negative influence of peers and negative patterns of parent–child interactions to explain risky and unethical consumer behaviors. We take a different perspective by focusing on the positive support of parents and peers in adolescent social development. An integrative model is developed that links parental and peer support with adolescents’ self-worth motives, their materialistic tendencies, and their consumer ethical beliefs. In a study of 984 adolescents, we demonstrate support for a sequential mediation model in which peer and parental support is positively related to adolescents’ self-esteem and feelings of power, which are each associated with decreased materialism as a means of compensating for low self-worth. This reduced materialism is, in turn, associated with more ethical consumer beliefs

Brand Assets and Pay Fairness as Two Routes to Enhancing Social Capital in Sales Organization

Maria ROUZIOU, Riley DUGAN, Dominique ROUZIES, Dawn IACOBUCCI

Journal of Personal Selling & Sales Management

2018, vol. 38, n°2, pp.191-204

Departments: Marketing, GREGHEC (CNRS)

Keywords: brand identification, job satisfaction, pay fairness, salespeople, social capital

https://www.tandfonline.com/doi/abs/10.1080/08853134.2017.1384699


A growing body of research in sales highlights the importance of intrafirm relationships. Indeed, sales executives are encouraged to manage internal relationships within their sales force to facilitate high levels of performance. In this research, we examine the concept of social capital – its antecedents and consequences – in the context of a B2B sales organization. In particular, we conceptualize and test two alternative means of enhancing a salesperson's social capital: the impact of branding and perceptions of pay fairness. We then demonstrate how social capital embedded in sales-force relationships can be leveraged through job satisfaction and used to increase sales performance


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