Articles

A Comparative Overview of EU and US Legislative and Regulatory Systems: Implications for Domestic Governance & the Transatlantic Trade and Investment Partnership

A. ALEMANNO, R. W. PARKER

Columbia Journal of European Law

Winter 2016, vol. 22, n°1

Departments: Tax & Law, GREGHEC (CNRS)

Keywords: TTIP, Regulatory Cooperation, Convergence, Divergence, Mutual Recognition, Equivalence, MRA, US-EU, race to the bottom, direct effect, implementation

https://papers.ssrn.com/sol3/papers.cfm?abstract_id=2721038


The aim of this report is to inform the EU-US Transatlantic Trade and Investment negotiations on enhanced regulatory coherence and cooperation, by providing negotiators, stakeholders and the public with a comparative overview of the US and EU legislative and regulatory processes in their current form, highlighting differences and similarities

A theorem on aggregating classifications

F. MANIQUET, P. MONGIN

Mathematical Social Sciences

January 2016, vol. 79, pp.6-10

Departments: Economics & Decision Sciences, GREGHEC (CNRS)

Keywords: Aggregation of classifications, Group identification problem, Task assignment problem, Nonbinary evaluations

http://ssrn.com/abstract=2686037


Suppose that a group of individuals must classify objects into three or more categories, and does so by aggregating the individual classifications. We show that if the classifications, both individual and collective, are required to put at least one object in each category, then no aggregation rule can satisfy a unanimity and an independence condition without being dictatorial. This impossibility theorem extends a result that Kasher and Rubinstein (1997) proved for two categories and complements another that Dokow and Holzman (2010) obtained for three or more categories under the condition that classifications put at most one object in each category. The paper discusses an interpretation of its result both in terms of Kasher and Rubinstein’s group identification problem and in terms of Dokow and Holzman’s task assignment problem.

A Two-sided Matching Approach for Partner Selection and Assessing Complementarities in Partners’ Attributes in Inter-firm Alliances

D. MINDRUTA, M. MOEEN, R. AGARWAL

Strategic Management Journal

January 2016, vol. 37, n°1, pp.206-231

Departments: Strategy & Business Policy, GREGHEC (CNRS)

Keywords: Alliance formation, Partner selection, Matching models, Complementarities, Empirical methods

http://ssrn.com/abstract=2536109


Strategic alliances are undertaken to create value through complementarities of resources and capabilities of the partner firms. We develop a matching framework to study strategic alliances, taking a market perspective that explicitly incorporates key features of transactions in strategic alliances: two sided decision making in voluntary collaboration; quest for complementarities between indivisible and heterogeneous partner attributes; and competition on each side for partners on the other side. We assess the relative performance of matching models and binary choice models when estimating parameters within simulations based on a known functional relationship. Within the context of research alliances in the bio-pharmaceutical industry, we hypothesize and find support using the matching model framework for complementarity in partner size, and in upstream research capabilities

Adaptive use of social networking applications in contemporary organizations: Examining the motivations of Gen Y cohorts

Anuragini SHIRISH, Imed BOUGHZALA, S. C. SRIVASTAVA

International Journal of Information Management

December 2016, vol. 36, n°6, part A, pp.1111–1123

Departments: Informations Systems and Operations Management, GREGHEC (CNRS)

Keywords: Corporate social networking; Adaptive use intention; Technology adoption; Collaboration; Innovation; Generation Y; Motivation

http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0268401216301918


With the entry of the contemporary generation (Gen Y) into the workforce, organizations are interested in leveraging Gen Y’s technological preferences when designing their information systems. Specifically, motivated by Gen Y’s dependence on Social Networking Applications (SNAs) in their private lives, organizations have initiated the implementation of Corporate Social Networks (CSNs) to facilitate closer collaboration and knowledge sharing within organizations. However, these initiatives have not been received with the expected enthusiasm from Gen Y employees. To better understand this apparent anomaly, the current study explores the Gen Y cohort’s intended adaptive use of SNAs in organizational settings, as CSNs. This study uses an enriched Delphi technique to examine the perceptions and concerns of members of Gen Y regarding use of CSNs. In addition, employing a structured qualitative approach and contextualizing the needs hierarchy theory to the specific case of Gen Y employees, this study identifies six organizational requirements for successfully implementing CSNs. This work extends the literature on adaptive use of Enterprise 2.0 systems and delineates a set of useful implications for managers intending to implement such systems for Gen Y employees.

Ambiguity Aversion and Household Choice Puzzles: Empirical Evidence

S. G. DIMMOCK, R. KOUWENBERG, O. S. MITCHELL, K. PEIJNENBURG

Journal of Financial Economics

March 2016, vol. 119, pp.559-577

Departments: Finance, GREGHEC (CNRS)

Keywords: Ambiguity aversion; Stock market participation; Household portfolio puzzles; Home-bias; Own-company stock puzzle; Portfolio under-diversification; Household finance; Financial literacy

http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0304405X16000040?via%3Dihub


We test the relation between ambiguity aversion and five household portfolio choice puz- zles: nonparticipation in equities, low allocations to equity, home-bias, own-company stock ownership, and portfolio under-diversification. In a representative US household survey, we measure ambiguity preferences using custom-designed questions based on Ellsberg urns. As theory predicts, ambiguity aversion is negatively associated with stock market partic- ipation, the fraction of financial assets in stocks, and foreign stock ownership, but it is positively related to own-company stock ownership. Conditional on stock ownership, am- biguity aversion is related to portfolio under-diversification, and during the financial crisis, ambiguity-averse respondents were more likely to sell stocks


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