Articles

Herding and Social Media Word-of-Mouth: Evidence from Groupon

X. LI, L. WU

MIS Quarterly

Forthcoming

Departments: Information Systems and Operations Management, GREGHEC (CNRS)

Keywords: Herding, word-of-mouth, social media, interaction effect, complementarity


Modern online retailing practices provide consumers with new types of real-time information that can potentially increase demand. In particular, showing past product sales information can reduce uncertainty about product quality, inducing consumers to herd. This effect could be particularly salient for experience goods due to their inherent high uncertainty about product quality. Social media word-of-mouth (WOM) can increase product awareness as product information spreads via social media, increasing demand directly and also amplifying existing quality signals such as past sales. This study examines the mechanisms behind the strategy of facilitating herding and the strategy of integrating social media platforms to understand the potential complementarities between the two strategies. We conduct empirical analysis using data from Groupon.com which sells goods in a fast cycle format of “daily deals”. We find that facilitating herding and integrating social media platforms are complements in generating sales, supporting that it is beneficial to combine the two strategies on social media-driven platforms. Furthermore, we find that herding is more salient for experience goods, consistent with our hypothesized mechanisms, while the effect of social media WOM does not differ between experience goods and search goods

Impact of Average Rating on Social Media Endorsement: The Moderating Role of Rating Dispersion and Discount Threshold

X. LI

Information Systems Research

Forthcoming

Departments: Information Systems and Operations Management, GREGHEC (CNRS)


Social Presence in Virtual World Collaboration: An Uncertainty Reduction Perspective Using a Mixed Methods Approach

S. C. SRIVASTAVA, S. CHANDRA

MIS Quarterly

Forthcoming

Departments: Information Systems and Operations Management, GREGHEC (CNRS)

Keywords: Virtual worlds, uncertainty reduction theory, institutional trust, sequential mixed methods

http://www.misq.org/skin/frontend/default/misq/pdf/Abstracts/11914_RA_SrivastavaAbstract.pdf


The life-like collaborative potential offered by virtual worlds (VWs) has sparked significant interest for companies to experiment with VWs in order to organize convenient, cost-effective virtual global workplaces. Despite the initial hype, recent years have witnessed a rather stagnant use of VWs for collaboration in organizations. Previous research recognizes that the inherent uncertainties within the VW environment are factors limiting their utilization by businesses. Hence, grounding this research in uncertainty reduction theory (URT), we aim to understand the modalities and mechanisms for mitigating the uncertainties and fostering user trust within VWs so that they can be effectively utilized as a workplace collaboration tool. With this end in view, we propose contextualizing and extending McKnight et al.’s (2002) institutional trust framework to the context of VWs by examining the significant role that social presence has in influencing the efficacy of the institution-based trust-building factors of situational normality and structural assurance in VWs. Using a sequential mixed methods approach (Venkatesh et al. 2013; Venkatesh et al. 2016), this research integrates results from a quantitative study with findings from a qualitative study to arrive at rich and robust inferences and meta-inferences, with the qualitative method first corroborating the inferences obtained from the quantitative research and then complementing them by identifying boundary conditions that may limit the use of VWs in organizations for workplace collaboration. The results together suggest not only the direct, but also the interactional (complementary and substitutive) influences of social presence on the relationships of the two institutional-trust-building factors to user trust in VWs

Analyzing Degree of Parallelism for Concurrent Timed Workflow Processes With Shared Resources

Yanhua DU, Li WANG, X. LI

IEEE Transactions on Engineering Management

February 2017, vol. 64, n°1, pp.42 - 56

Departments: Information Systems and Operations Management, GREGHEC (CNRS)

Keywords: Business, Servers, Computational modeling, Uncertainty, Analytical models, Processor scheduling, workflow management, Business process management, degree of parallelism, Petri net (PN), timed workflow net (TWF-Net)

http://ieeexplore.ieee.org/document/7778113/


Degree of parallelism is an important factor in workflow process management, because it is useful to accurately estimate the server costs and schedule severs in workflow processes. However, existing methods that are developed to compute degree of parallelism neglect to consider activities with uncertain execution time. In addition, these methods are limited in dealing with the situation where activities in multiple concurrent workflow processes use shared resources. To address the limitations, we propose a new approach to analyzing degree of parallelism for concurrent workflow processes with shared resources. Superior over the existing methods, our approach can compute degree of parallelism for multiple concurrent workflow processes that have activities with uncertain execution time and shared resources. Expectation degree of parallelism is useful to estimate the server costs of the workflow processes, and maximum degree of parallelism can guide managers to allocate severs or virtual machines based on the business requirement. We demonstrate the application of the approach and evaluate the effectiveness in a real-world business scenario.

Developing knowledge from entrepreneurial actions – toward a taxonomy

T. PARIS, S. JOUINI, S. BUREAU

Journal of Small Business and Enterprise Development

2017, vol. 24, n°4, pp.793-813

Departments: GREGHEC (CNRS), Information Systems and Operations Management

Keywords: Experiential learning, Qualitative method, Knowledge development, Entrepreneurial learning

http://www.emeraldinsight.com/doi/pdfplus/10.1108/JSBED-10-2016-0155


Purpose – The purpose of this paper is to enrich our understanding of entrepreneurs’ daily deeds, tasks and activities. The research investigates the ways in which entrepreneurs seize opportunities and gain knowledge from the start to the expansion of their ventures.Design/methodology/approach – Two case studies were developed based on a longitudinal fine-grained analysis of two ventures over two years. Entrepreneurs’ success and learning were modeled in line with grounded theory methodology. Data were collected from both primary and secondary sources in the form of semi-structured interviews and archival documentation.Findings – The authors develop an original conceptual framework that consists of ten entrepreneurial learning opportunities and four knowledge development modes. There are ten generic types of actions that entrepreneurs take. There are then four distinctive ways to transform these experiences into knowledge. The model is assessed in absolute terms and relatively to existing taxonomies.Research limitations/implications – The findings question the premises on which entrepreneurial learning research traditionally relies. Opportunities can be open-ended rather than purely instrumental. Similarly, knowledge can be emerging as much as it can be espoused. This opens-up space for further research.Practical implications – For practitioners, the findings suggest new ways for making sense of the daily experience of their entrepreneurial endeavor. The learning modes suggested can be used by coaches and mentors when helping entrepreneurs in their venture.Originality/value – The research provides empirical evidence of what entrepreneurs do. This may help cast traditional debates about what there is to do (logical necessity) and what there is to know (a priori knowledge) in a new light.


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