A Dual-Process Model of Interactivity Effects


Journal of Advertising

Summer 2009, vol. 38, n°2, pp.53-68

Departments: Marketing, GREGHEC (CNRS)

Although interactivity is often considered to have a positive influence on persuasion, research on interactivity effects is actually very mixed. This paper argues that under certain circumstances, interactivity may either enhance or inhibit persuasion. A dual-process model of interactivity effects is proposed and tested that posits differential effects of interactivity on persuasion depending on person and situation factors. Results of an experiment that manipulated level of Web site interactivity and task involvement, and measured user ability (Internet usage experience), show that under low-involvement conditions, the mere presence of interactivity served as a peripheral cue that led to more positive attitudes regardless of ability (experience). Under high-involvement conditions, however, interactivity elicited more positive attitudes for experienced users but less positive attitudes for inexperienced users. Implications for the use of interactivity in advertising and promotions are discussed