Research Seminars

TBD

Accounting & Management Control

Speaker: Bruce Carruthers
Northwestern University

20 October 2017 - HEC Paris - Room T004 - From 2:00 am to 4:00 am


TBD

Accounting & Management Control

Speaker: Eli Amir
London Business School

6 October 2017 - HEC Paris - Room T004 - From 2:00 pm to 4:00 pm


Joint seminar HEC/ESSEC - Paper TBD

Accounting & Management Control

Speaker: Clinton Free
UNSW Australia Business School

20 June 2017 - Champerret - Amphi 461 - From 2:00 pm to 4:00 pm


Economics & Decision Sciences

Speaker: Michele Tertilt
University of Mannheim

15 June 2017


TBD

Accounting & Management Control

Speaker: Gerald Lobo
University of Houston

13 June 2017 - HEC Paris - room T004 - From 2:00 am to 4:00 am


Strategy & Business Policy

Speaker: Sendhil Ethiraj
LBS

8 June 2017


Finance

Speaker: Anna Scherbina
UC Davis

8 June 2017 - From 2:00 pm to 3:15 pm


Strategy & Business Policy

Speaker: Tanya Menon
Ohio State University

6 June 2017 - T004 - From 1:30 pm to 3:00 pm


TBD

Accounting & Management Control

Speaker: Jeff Everett
York University

2 June 2017 - HEC Paris - Room T004 - From 2:00 pm to 4:00 pm


Trash-Talking: Competitive Incivility Motivates Rivalry, Performance, and Unethical Behavior

Management & Human Resources

Speaker: Maurice Schweitzer
The Wharton School, University of Pennsylvania, USA

2 June 2017 - T004 - From 10:00 am to 11:30 am


Trash-talking increases the psychological stakes of competition. Across two pilot studies and four experiments, we demonstrate that trash-talking motivates targets to outperform their opponents. Across, two pilot studies we show that (1) people readily recall instances of trash-talking in organizations and (2) people fail to forecast the motivational consequences of trash-talking. In Study 1, participants in a competition who were targets of trash-talking outperformed participants who faced the same economic incentives, but were not targets of trash talking. In Study 2, we replicate this finding and show that perceptions of rivalry mediate the relationship between trash-talking and performance. In Study 3, we find that targets of trash-talking are particularly motivated to see their opponents lose. In Study 4, we show that participants who were targets of trash talking were more likely to cheat in a competition that were participants who received a neutral message. Taken together, our findings reveal that trash talking is a common workplace behavior that can foster rivalry and motivate both constructive and unethical behavior.