Research Seminars

Article TBD

Accounting & Management Control

Speaker: Yves GENDRON
Laval

29 October 2015 - From 2:00 pm to 4:00 pm


Article TBD

Accounting & Management Control

Speaker: Yue LI
Rotman

19 June 2015 - From 2:00 pm to 4:00 pm


Finance

Speaker: Johannes Stroebel
New York University

11 June 2015


Finance

Speaker: Gustavo Manso
Berkeley

4 June 2015


Article TBD

Accounting & Management Control

Speaker: Lakshmanan SHIVAKUMAR (Shiva°
LBS

29 May 2015 - From 2:00 pm to 4:00 pm


Finance

Speaker: Snehal Banerjee
Kellogg

21 May 2015


Finance

Speaker: Jesper Rangvid
Copenhagen Business School

7 May 2015


Finance

Speaker: Shmuel Baruch
The University of Utah

30 April 2015


Stockpiling Points in Linear Loyalty Programs

Marketing

Speaker: Valeria STOURM
Wharton School, University of Pennsylvania

23 April 2015 - Building T, Room 201 - From 11:00 am to 12:30 pm


In a standard loyalty program, a single retailer offers rewards to customers who stockpile points up to a certain amount. While research on these archetypal programs is vast, there is an emerging stream of work on programs that are structured differently. My dissertation, titled “New insights from emerging types of loyalty programs,” studies how consumers engage with two examples of atypical programs. The first is a linear loyalty program, which offers points that can be redeemed at any time and in any amount. The second is a coalition loyalty program, in which customers can earn and redeem points across different types of stores.

During this talk I will present work that empirically explains why customers of a linear program seem to be motivated to persistently stockpile points, even though the retailer does not reward them for doing so. The potential motivations modeled are economic (the value of forgone points), cognitive (nonmonetary transaction costs), and psychological (points are valued differently than cash). The psychological motivation is captured by allowing customers to book cash and point transactions in separate mental accounts. After presenting this research, time permitting, I plan to preview my dissertation work on modeling how customers shop across the retail stores of a popular European coalition loyalty program.

Consumer Stockpiling and Demand Complementarity

Marketing

Speaker: Ludovic STOURM
Wharton School, University of Pennsylvania

16 April 2015 - Building T, Room 037 - From 1:30 pm to 3:00 pm


Previous research studying the effect of prices and promotions across categories has mostly focused on contemporaneous purchases. However, I suggest that complementary goods may be consumed together but purchased at different times if consumers stockpile them. As a result, joint consumption may also have implications for purchase patterns over time, which are better understood by considering consumption. Investigating the consequences of consumption complementarity raises methodological and theoretical challenges. First, how can we represent consumer preferences for the consumption of complements in a parametric model? Second, what are the theoretical implications of stockpiling on the effects of prices across categories? Third, how can we measure these effects? I address these questions in three dissertation essays. My results suggest that previous demand models which ignore the role of consumption may underestimate the effect of promotions across complementary categories.