Articles

An Integrative Model of the Influence of Parental and Peer Support on Consumer Ethical Beliefs: The Mediating Role of Self-Esteem, Power and Materialism

E. GENTINA, L. SHRUM, T. LOWREY, S. VITELL, G. ROSE

Journal of Business Ethics

Forthcoming

Departments: Marketing, GREGHEC (CNRS)

Keywords: Ethics, Adolescent consumers, Materialism, Self-esteem, Power, Peer support, Parental support


What causes adolescents to develop consumer’ ethipatterns of parent–child interactions to explain risky and unethical consumer behaviors. We take a different perspective by focusing on the positive support of parents and peers in adolescent social development. An integrative model is developed that links parental and peer support with adolescents’ self-worth motives, their materialistic tendencies, and their consumer ethical beliefs. In a study of 984 adolescents, we demonstrate support for a sequential mediation model in which peer and parental support is positively related to adolescents’ self-esteem and feelings of power, which are each associated with decreased materialism as a means of compensating for low self-worth. This reduced materialism is, in turn, associated with more etcal beliefs? Prior research has largely focused on the negative influence of peers and negative patterns of parent–child interactions to explain risky and unethical consumer behaviors. We take a different perspective by focusing on the positive support of parents and peers in adolescent social development. An integrative model is developed that links parental and peer support with adolescents’ self-worth motives, their materialistic tendencies, and their consumer ethical beliefs. In a study of 984 adolescents, we demonstrate support for a sequential mediation model in which peer and parental support is positively related to adolescents’ self-esteem and feelings of power, which are each associated with decreased materialism as a means of compensating for low self-worth. This reduced materialism is, in turn, associated with more ethical consumer beliefs

Belief-free price formation

S. LOVO, T. TOMALA, J. HÖRNER

Journal of Financial Economics

Forthcoming

Departments: Finance, GREGHEC (CNRS), Economics & Decision Sciences


Better Safe than Sorry: Subsidiary Performance Feedback and Internal Governance in Multiunit Firms

T. OBLOJ, m SENGUL

Journal of Management

Forthcoming

Departments: Strategy & Business Policy, GREGHEC (CNRS)


This paper explores the link between subsidiary performance feedback and internal governance mechanisms in multiunit firms. A central premise of performance feedback models is that performance below aspirations is associated with increased risk tolerance and thereby with a higher likelihood of taking excessive risks in resource allocation decisions. Building on this observation, we contend that the headquarters of multiunit firms take this association into account in the design of internal (i.e., headquarters-subsidiary) governance mechanisms. Accordingly, a subsidiary’s performance-aspiration gap (below aspirations) is positively associated with the headquarters’ oversight of its resource allocation decisions and negatively associated with the provision of incentive schemes that promote risk taking. Regression results, using data on subsidiaries in France between 1998 and 2004, support our hypotheses and show that subsidiaries performing below historical and social aspirations are less likely to be given discretion in investment decisions and incentivized by cash bonuses. In the supplementary analyses we also provide suggestive evidence that subsidiary performance problems in multiunit firms trigger structural adaptation in the internal governance mechanisms in pursuit of regaining fit

Bouncing Back: Building Resilience Through Social and Environmental Practices in the Context of the 2008 Global Financial Crisis

M. DESJARDINE, P. BANSAL, Y. YANG

Journal of Management

Forthcoming

Departments: Strategy & Business Policy, GREGHEC (CNRS)

Keywords: organizational resilience; social and environmental practices; strategic and tactical practices; global financial crisis; survival analysis

http://journals.sagepub.com/doi/abs/10.1177/0149206317708854


Even though organizational researchers have acknowledged the role of social and environmental business practices in contributing to organizational resilience, this work remains scarce, possibly because of the difficulties in measuring organizational resilience. In this paper, we aim to partly remedy this issue by measuring two ways in which organizational resilience manifests through organizational outcomes in a generalized environmental disturbance—namely, severity of loss, which captures the stability dimension of resilience, and time to recovery, which captures the flexibility dimension. By isolating these two variables, we can then theorize the types of social and environmental practices that contribute to resilience. Specifically, we argue that strategic social and environmental practices contribute more to organizational resilience than do tactical social and environmental practices. We test our theory by analyzing the responses of 963 U.S.-based firms to the global financial crisis and find evidence that support our hypotheses

Brand Assets and Pay Fairness as Two Routes to Enhancing Social Capital in Sales Organization

Maria ROUZIOU, Riley DUGAN, Dominique ROUZIES, Dawn IACOBUCCI

Journal of Personal Selling & Sales Management

Forthcoming

Departments: Marketing, GREGHEC (CNRS)



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