Articles

Belief-free price formation

S. LOVO, T. TOMALA, J. HÖRNER

Journal of Financial Economics

Forthcoming

Departments: Finance, GREGHEC (CNRS), Economics & Decision Sciences


Bouncing Back: Building Resilience Through Social and Environmental Practices in the Context of the 2008 Global Financial Crisis

M. DESJARDINE, P. BANSAL, Y. YANG

Journal of Management

Forthcoming

Departments: Strategy & Business Policy, GREGHEC (CNRS)

Keywords: organizational resilience; social and environmental practices; strategic and tactical practices; global financial crisis; survival analysis

http://journals.sagepub.com/doi/abs/10.1177/0149206317708854


Even though organizational researchers have acknowledged the role of social and environmental business practices in contributing to organizational resilience, this work remains scarce, possibly because of the difficulties in measuring organizational resilience. In this paper, we aim to partly remedy this issue by measuring two ways in which organizational resilience manifests through organizational outcomes in a generalized environmental disturbance—namely, severity of loss, which captures the stability dimension of resilience, and time to recovery, which captures the flexibility dimension. By isolating these two variables, we can then theorize the types of social and environmental practices that contribute to resilience. Specifically, we argue that strategic social and environmental practices contribute more to organizational resilience than do tactical social and environmental practices. We test our theory by analyzing the responses of 963 U.S.-based firms to the global financial crisis and find evidence that support our hypotheses

Brand Assets and Pay Fairness as Two Routes to Enhancing Social Capital in Sales Organization

Maria ROUZIOU, Riley DUGAN, Dominique ROUZIES, Dawn IACOBUCCI

Journal of Personal Selling & Sales Management

Forthcoming

Departments: Marketing, GREGHEC (CNRS)


Can Innovation Help U.S. Manufacturing Firms Escape Import Competition from China?

J. HOMBERT, A. MATRAY

The Journal of Finance

Forthcoming

Departments: Finance, GREGHEC (CNRS)


We study whether R&D-intensive firms are more resilient to trade shocks. Wecorrect for the endogeneity of R&D using tax-induced changes to R&D cost. While rising imports from China lead to slower sales growth and lower profitability, these effects are significantly smaller for firms with a larger stock of R&D (by about half when moving from the bottom quartile to the top quartile of R&D). We provide evidence that this effect is explained R&D allowing firms to increase product differentiation. As a result, while firms in import-competing industries cut capital expenditures and employment, R&D-intensive firms downsize considerably less

Collaborative Prototyping of Alternative Designs Under a Target Costing Scheme

T. SHALPEGIN, S. SOMMER, Z. WAN

Production and Operations Management

Forthcoming

Keywords: Collaborative prototyping, Parallel and sequential testing, Supplier involvement, Target costing


Prototyping allows firms to evaluate the technical feasibility of alternative product designs and to better estimate their costs. We study a collaborative prototyping scenario in which a manufacturer involves a supplier in the prototyping process by letting the supplier make detailed design choices for critical components and provide prototypes for testing. While the supplier can obtain private information about the costs, the manufacturer uses target costing to gain control over the design choice. We show that involving the supplier in the prototyping process has an important influence on the manufacturer's optimal decisions. The collaboration results in information asymmetry, which makes parallel prototyping less attractive and potentially reverses the optimal testing sequence under sequential prototyping: It may be optimal to test designs in increasing order of attractiveness to avoid that the supplier does not release technically and economically feasible prototypes for strategic reasons. We also find that the classical target costing approaches (cost- and market-based) need to be adjusted in the presence of alternative designs: Due to the strategic behavior of suppliers, it is not always optimal to provide identical target costs for designs with similar cost and performance estimates, nor to provide different target costs for dissimilar designs. Furthermore, the timing is important: While committing upfront to carefully chosen target costs reduces the supplier's strategic behavior, in some circumstances, the manufacturer can take advantage of this behavior by remaining flexible and specifying the second prototype's target costs later


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