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Frederic DALSACE

Professeur Associé, mis en disponibilité

Marketing

 Profile picture

Biographie

Frédéric Dalsace est titulaire d'un MBA de la Harvard Business School, et d'un Doctorat (Ph.D.) en Marketing de l'INSEAD.

Sa recherche se focalise sur les relations inter-organisationnelles, comme l'externalisation, les liens clients-fournisseurs et l'innovation ouverte. Son travail de thèse a reçu en 2001 le Prix de la Fondation Canon et le Prix ISBM (Institute for the Study of Business Market) qui distingue la meilleure recherché dans le domaine B2B. Il a publié dans des journaux tels que Strategic Management Journal, Business Horizons et la Harvard Business review. Frédéric Dalsace a reçu le prix de la Fondation HEC pour la meilleure publication publiée en 2004 par l'ensemble de la faculté, et le Prix ACA-Bruel pour la meilleure recherche publiée en 2005 dans le domaine des achats.

Frédéric Dalsace a travaillé pendant plus de 10 ans dans des entreprises industrielles (Michelin et CarnaudMetalbox), en Europe et au Japon, et en tant que consultant en stratégie chez McKinsey & Company. Il a reçu le Prix Vernimmen-BNP Paribas 2006 qui distingue le meilleur enseignant du Groupe HEC (vote des étudiants)

Articles scientifiques

Reaching the Rich World's Poorest Consumers

Harvard Business Review, mars 2015, vol. 93, n° 3, pp 46-53

The friend or foe fallacy: Why your best customers may not need your friendship

Business Horizons, juillet-août 2017, vol. 60, n° 4, pp 483-493

Les pénalités de pauvreté en France : comment le marché aggrave la situation des populations pauvres

Facts Reports (Field ACTions Science Reports), 2012, n° 4,

Structurer le débat « entreprises et pauvretés ». Légitimité, intérêt, modalité, efficacité

Revue Française de Gestion, novembre 2010, vol. 36, n° 208-209, pp 15-44

Brand Magic: Harry Potter marketing

Harvard Business Review, février 2007, vol. 85, n° 2,

Should You Set Up Your Own Sales Force or Should You Outsource It ? Pitfalls in the Standard Analysis

Business Horizons, janvier-février 2005, vol. 48, n° 1, pp 23-36

Do Make or Buy Decisions matter ? The Influence of Organizational Governance on Technological Performance

Strategic Management Journal, septembre 2002, vol. 23, n° 9, pp 817-833

Redefining Supplier Development Programs

Revue Internationale de l'Achat, 2002, vol. 22, n° 1,

Chapters edited in books

L'apprentissage comme motivation de l'externalisation

L'Art Du Management, HEC Paris, Dunod, Paris, 234-240

Actes de conférence

Successful Solution Deployment: How Manufacturing Firms can Leverage their Channel Partne

Successful Solution Deployment: How Manufacturing Firms can Leverage their Channel Partners

ISBM Academic Conference 2012 , 2012 , Boston (C. Renault, W. Ulaga, S. WORM)

Consumers, not Brands: "Potterian" Marketing as a Potential Alternative to the Traditional Marketing Model in Fast Moving Consumer Goods

36th EMAC Annual Conference , 2007 , Reykjavik

Supplier Selection in Horizontal Alliances: The Role and Transferability of Relational Rents

36th EMAC Annual Conference , 2007 , Reykjavik

Cahiers de recherche

Inter-Organizational Communities of Practice: Specificities and Stakes

Cahier de Recherche du Groupe HEC , 2006

Do Insider Effect and Ex-post Rationalization in NPD Research threaten what we know about drivers of NPD performance ? Results of an experimental simulation

Mimeo , 2008

The Overlooked Difference between Process- and Project- Acceleration: Evidence from a New Product Development Simulation

Mimeo , 2007

Is Marketing Becoming a Dirty Word? A Longitudinal Study of Public Perceptions of Marketing

Cahier de Recherche du Groupe HEC , 2009

Relational Rents Meet Social Rigidity: Barriers to Pooling Network Resources in Alliances

Mimeo , 2009

Has Marketing become a dirty word?

Mimeo , 2008

Relational rents meet social rigidity: barriers to pooling network resources in purchasing alliances

Mimeo , 2008

Relational Subcontracting: the Importance of Relationships in the Subcontracting Behavior of French SMEs

Mimeo , 2007

The Impact of Competitive Competition and Channel Type on the Development of Relational Marketing

Mimeo , 2007

We succeeded, therefore we did well: Ex-Post Rationalization Bias in NPD Practices

Mimeo , 2007

Cas pédagogiques

Combining Business and Societal Objectives at Danone

Danone is a leading European food multinational company who has been aggressively pursuing societal ("CSR") objectives for more than 40 years, and has developed an even more ambitious dual project since 2008. In 2011, in the aftermath of the worldwide crisis, the firm finds it increasingly difficult to meet its growth and profit objectives. Some voices in the Executive Committee are complaining that the societal agenda is putting undue pressure on the business. The case briefly outlines Danone history and describes the organization and platforms enabling the firm to implement its new vision, which integrates business and societal objectives. The different platforms are illustrated by 12 examples of societal projects conducted throughout the world. In many instances the case hints at the way Danone uses CSR as a lever for transforming the company. Danone needs to reexamine its societal approach to see whether it hinders or helps achieve business results. This begs the questions of 1) the legitimacy of Danone's management to develop these CSR initiatives 2) the method chosen by the firm to do so (how is Danone developing its dual approach?) and 3) the results accomplished so far. , 2014 , Corporate Social Responsibility (CSR), General Strategy, Inclusive Business Models, Social Business. , SnO (http://www.ccmp.fr/collection-hec-paris/cas-combining-business-and-societal-objectives-at-danone)

GRAMEEN DANONE FOOD LIMITED (A): Creating a social business in Bangladesh

The cases examine how Danone, the leading French food company, and Grameen, Mohammed Yunus' organization, built Grameen Danone Food Limited (GDFL), the first "Social Business" ever co-developed according to the 2006 Nobel Prize winner principles During an informal lunch with Mohammed Yunus, Danone CEO's Franck Riboud agreed to form a Social Business (SB) in order to fight children's malnutrition in Bangladesh. This hand-shake resulted in the construction of a small plant in Bogra, designed to produce "shokti-doi", yoghurt specifically developed for Bangladesh. The development of such a new organizational form is far from being smooth, however, raising legitimate questions about its true potential as a way to alleviate poverty. Although no definitive answer can be provided at this stage, the case series provide instructors with enough details to illustrate the pros and cons of social businesses. More fundamentally, the series examine the use of market-based solutions to fight poverty and illustrate how firms exercise their Corporate Social Responsibility (CSR). Case A is positioned in December 2008, at a time when GDFL's model is clearly not performing. It gives an historical perspective on the joint-venture, and underlines the tension between the business' social and the economic aspects. Cases B and C are short follow-up cases designed to be distributed in class. , 2012 , Food company, poverty, nutritious food, social business, ethics, corporate social responsibility, marketing, corporate alliance, Bangladesh. , SnO (http://www.ccmp.fr/collection-hec-paris/cas-grameen-danone-food-limited-a-creating-a-social-business-in-bangladesh)

GRAMEEN DANONE FOOD LIMITED (B): New Directions

The cases examine how Danone, the leading French food company, and Grameen, Mohammed Yunus' organization, built Grameen Danone Food Limited (GDFL), the first "Social Business" ever co-developed according to the 2006 Nobel Prize winner principles. During an informal lunch with Mohammed Yunus, Danone CEO's Franck Riboud agreed to form a Social Business (SB) in order to fight children's malnutrition in Bangladesh. This hand-shake resulted in the construction of a small plant in Bogra, designed to produce "shokti-doi", yoghurt specifically developed for Bangladesh. The development of such a new organizational form is far from being smooth, however, raising legitimate questions about its true potential as a way to alleviate poverty. Although no definitive answer can be provided at this stage, the case series provide instructors with enough details to illustrate the pros and cons of social businesses. More fundamentally, the series examine the use of market-based solutions to fight poverty and illustrate how firms exercise their Corporate Social Responsibility (CSR). Case A is positioned in December 2008, at a time when GDFL's model is clearly not performing. It gives an historical perspective on the joint-venture, and underlines the tension between the business' social and the economic aspects. Cases B and C are short follow-up cases designed to be distributed in class. , 2012 , Food company, poverty, nutritious food, social business, ethics, corporate social responsibility, marketing, corporate alliance, Bangladesh. , SnO (http://www.ccmp.fr/collection-hec-paris/cas-grameen-danone-food-limited-b-new-directions)

GRAMEEN DANONE FOOD LIMITED (C): Update

The cases examine how Danone, the leading French food company, and Grameen, Mohammed Yunus' organization, built Grameen Danone Food Limited (GDFL), the first "Social Business" ever co-developed according to the 2006 Nobel Prize winner principles. During an informal lunch with Mohammed Yunus, Danone CEO's Franck Riboud agreed to form a Social Business (SB) in order to fight children's malnutrition in Bangladesh. This hand-shake resulted in the construction of a small plant in Bogra, designed to produce "shokti-doi", yoghurt specifically developed for Bangladesh. The development of such a new organizational form is far from being smooth, however, raising legitimate questions about its true potential as a way to alleviate poverty. Although no definitive answer can be provided at this stage, the case series provide instructors with enough details to illustrate the pros and cons of social businesses. More fundamentally, the series examine the use of market-based solutions to fight poverty and illustrate how firms exercise their Corporate Social Responsibility (CSR). Case A is positioned in December 2008, at a time when GDFL's model is clearly not performing. It gives an historical perspective on the joint-venture, and underlines the tension between the business' social and the economic aspects. Cases B and C are short follow-up cases designed to be distributed in class. , 2012 , Food company, poverty, nutritious food, social business, ethics, corporate social responsibility, marketing, corporate alliance, Bangladesh. , SnO (http://www.ccmp.fr/collection-hec-paris/cas-grameen-danone-food-limited-c-update)

Michelin Fleet Solutions. De la vente de pneumatiques à la vente de kilomètres

Solutions; Transition from product to service; Service excellence; Business model change; Fleet management; Channel relationships; Sales force management; Service economy; Customer value; Environmental, friendly business models , 2012 , Solutions; Transition du produit au service; Excellence de service; Changement de modèle économique; Gestion de flotte; Gestion des forces de vente; Economie de service; Valeur client; Modèles économiques respectueux de l'environnement , SnO (http://www.ccmp.fr/collection-hec-paris/cas-michelin-fleet-solutions-de-la-vente-de-pneumatiques-a-la-vente-de-kilometres)

Michelin Fleet Solutions: From selling tires to selling kilometers

Michelin, a worldwide leader in the tyre industry, launched in 2000 a comprehensive tyre-management solution offer for large European transportation companies, called Michelin Fleet Solutions (MFS). With this new business model, the company ventured into selling kilometers - instead of selling tyres. This decision moves the strongly product-driven firm into the new world of services and solutions. The shift is intuitively appealing, and it provides Michelin with an opportunity to differentiate itself in the tyre business. After 3 years, however, expansion is far below expectations and profitability is terrible - despite the outside help of a strategy consulting firm. The case presents the decision point in 2003, whereby MFS's future has to be decided. Should Michelin seek to further develop this solution offer, and try to repackage the offer yet another time? Or was it just a passing fad that should be abandoned? This case investigates the difficulties that industrial groups face when they transition from selling products to providing service. It enables participants to reflect on the following issues: What's industrial groups' rationale for moving towards solutions? What kind of business model reconfiguration does it imply? How does moving to solutions raise multiple challenges throughout the organization (eg in terms of sales force management, risk management, channel relationships etc)? , 2012 , Solutions; Transition from product to service; Service excellence; Business model change; Fleet management; Channel relationships; Sales force management; Service economy; Customer value; Environmental, friendly business models , SnO (http://www.ccmp.fr/collection-hec-paris/cas-michelin-fleet-solutions-from-selling-tires-to-selling-kilometers)

Michelin: Energy 4

Michelin, one of the worldwide leaders in the tire business, needs to decide on the market positioning and definition of the next generation of its main passenger "Energy" car tire line in Europe, a major investment. Tires are sold on two different - yet related - markets, with markedly different requirements, and these requirements are evolving in separate directions. On the one hand, there is some indication that the smaller and less profitable Original Equipment Market (OE) is now looking for tires that will help car makers to reach their targets in terms of average fuel efficiency and in terms of carbon dioxide emissions levels. On the other hand, the Replacement Market (RT) does not really value or understand this characteristic yet. Instead, when they replace their tires, car drivers are seeking cheaper, longer-lasting tires that have superior grip, especially in wet conditions. As the RT market is the most important both in terms of sales and profit, the choice appears to be easy. However, the existence of a strong influence of the OE market on the RT market ("carry-over effect") makes this choice difficult. The option of selling two tire lines - one for each market - is also a possible solution, but it is costly in terms of manufacturing and logistics, and it reduces the carry-over effect. , 2012 , Value creation, value appropriation, car industry, B2B (http://www.ccmp.fr/collection-hec-paris/cas-michelin-energy-4)

Articles scientifiques

Reaching the Rich World's Poorest Consumers

Harvard Business Review, mars 2015, vol. 93, n° 3, pp 46-53

The friend or foe fallacy: Why your best customers may not need your friendship

Business Horizons, juillet-août 2017, vol. 60, n° 4, pp 483-493

Les pénalités de pauvreté en France : comment le marché aggrave la situation des populations pauvres

Facts Reports (Field ACTions Science Reports), 2012, n° 4,

Structurer le débat « entreprises et pauvretés ». Légitimité, intérêt, modalité, efficacité

Revue Française de Gestion, novembre 2010, vol. 36, n° 208-209, pp 15-44

Chapters edited in books

L'apprentissage comme motivation de l'externalisation

L'Art Du Management, HEC Paris, Dunod, Paris, 234-240

Actes de conférence

Successful Solution Deployment: How Manufacturing Firms can Leverage their Channel Partne

Successful Solution Deployment: How Manufacturing Firms can Leverage their Channel Partners

ISBM Academic Conference 2012 , 2012 , Boston (C. Renault, W. Ulaga, S. WORM)

Consumers, not Brands: "Potterian" Marketing as a Potential Alternative to the Traditional Marketing Model in Fast Moving Consumer Goods

36th EMAC Annual Conference , 2007 , Reykjavik

Supplier Selection in Horizontal Alliances: The Role and Transferability of Relational Rents

36th EMAC Annual Conference , 2007 , Reykjavik

Cahiers de recherche

Inter-Organizational Communities of Practice: Specificities and Stakes

Cahier de Recherche du Groupe HEC , 2006

Do Insider Effect and Ex-post Rationalization in NPD Research threaten what we know about drivers of NPD performance ? Results of an experimental simulation

Mimeo , 2008

The Overlooked Difference between Process- and Project- Acceleration: Evidence from a New Product Development Simulation

Mimeo , 2007

Is Marketing Becoming a Dirty Word? A Longitudinal Study of Public Perceptions of Marketing

Cahier de Recherche du Groupe HEC , 2009

Cas pédagogiques

Combining Business and Societal Objectives at Danone

Danone is a leading European food multinational company who has been aggressively pursuing societal ("CSR") objectives for more than 40 years, and has developed an even more ambitious dual project since 2008. In 2011, in the aftermath of the worldwide crisis, the firm finds it increasingly difficult to meet its growth and profit objectives. Some voices in the Executive Committee are complaining that the societal agenda is putting undue pressure on the business. The case briefly outlines Danone history and describes the organization and platforms enabling the firm to implement its new vision, which integrates business and societal objectives. The different platforms are illustrated by 12 examples of societal projects conducted throughout the world. In many instances the case hints at the way Danone uses CSR as a lever for transforming the company. Danone needs to reexamine its societal approach to see whether it hinders or helps achieve business results. This begs the questions of 1) the legitimacy of Danone's management to develop these CSR initiatives 2) the method chosen by the firm to do so (how is Danone developing its dual approach?) and 3) the results accomplished so far. , 2014 , Corporate Social Responsibility (CSR), General Strategy, Inclusive Business Models, Social Business. , SnO (http://www.ccmp.fr/collection-hec-paris/cas-combining-business-and-societal-objectives-at-danone)

GRAMEEN DANONE FOOD LIMITED (A): Creating a social business in Bangladesh

The cases examine how Danone, the leading French food company, and Grameen, Mohammed Yunus' organization, built Grameen Danone Food Limited (GDFL), the first "Social Business" ever co-developed according to the 2006 Nobel Prize winner principles During an informal lunch with Mohammed Yunus, Danone CEO's Franck Riboud agreed to form a Social Business (SB) in order to fight children's malnutrition in Bangladesh. This hand-shake resulted in the construction of a small plant in Bogra, designed to produce "shokti-doi", yoghurt specifically developed for Bangladesh. The development of such a new organizational form is far from being smooth, however, raising legitimate questions about its true potential as a way to alleviate poverty. Although no definitive answer can be provided at this stage, the case series provide instructors with enough details to illustrate the pros and cons of social businesses. More fundamentally, the series examine the use of market-based solutions to fight poverty and illustrate how firms exercise their Corporate Social Responsibility (CSR). Case A is positioned in December 2008, at a time when GDFL's model is clearly not performing. It gives an historical perspective on the joint-venture, and underlines the tension between the business' social and the economic aspects. Cases B and C are short follow-up cases designed to be distributed in class. , 2012 , Food company, poverty, nutritious food, social business, ethics, corporate social responsibility, marketing, corporate alliance, Bangladesh. , SnO (http://www.ccmp.fr/collection-hec-paris/cas-grameen-danone-food-limited-a-creating-a-social-business-in-bangladesh)

GRAMEEN DANONE FOOD LIMITED (B): New Directions

The cases examine how Danone, the leading French food company, and Grameen, Mohammed Yunus' organization, built Grameen Danone Food Limited (GDFL), the first "Social Business" ever co-developed according to the 2006 Nobel Prize winner principles. During an informal lunch with Mohammed Yunus, Danone CEO's Franck Riboud agreed to form a Social Business (SB) in order to fight children's malnutrition in Bangladesh. This hand-shake resulted in the construction of a small plant in Bogra, designed to produce "shokti-doi", yoghurt specifically developed for Bangladesh. The development of such a new organizational form is far from being smooth, however, raising legitimate questions about its true potential as a way to alleviate poverty. Although no definitive answer can be provided at this stage, the case series provide instructors with enough details to illustrate the pros and cons of social businesses. More fundamentally, the series examine the use of market-based solutions to fight poverty and illustrate how firms exercise their Corporate Social Responsibility (CSR). Case A is positioned in December 2008, at a time when GDFL's model is clearly not performing. It gives an historical perspective on the joint-venture, and underlines the tension between the business' social and the economic aspects. Cases B and C are short follow-up cases designed to be distributed in class. , 2012 , Food company, poverty, nutritious food, social business, ethics, corporate social responsibility, marketing, corporate alliance, Bangladesh. , SnO (http://www.ccmp.fr/collection-hec-paris/cas-grameen-danone-food-limited-b-new-directions)

GRAMEEN DANONE FOOD LIMITED (C): Update

The cases examine how Danone, the leading French food company, and Grameen, Mohammed Yunus' organization, built Grameen Danone Food Limited (GDFL), the first "Social Business" ever co-developed according to the 2006 Nobel Prize winner principles. During an informal lunch with Mohammed Yunus, Danone CEO's Franck Riboud agreed to form a Social Business (SB) in order to fight children's malnutrition in Bangladesh. This hand-shake resulted in the construction of a small plant in Bogra, designed to produce "shokti-doi", yoghurt specifically developed for Bangladesh. The development of such a new organizational form is far from being smooth, however, raising legitimate questions about its true potential as a way to alleviate poverty. Although no definitive answer can be provided at this stage, the case series provide instructors with enough details to illustrate the pros and cons of social businesses. More fundamentally, the series examine the use of market-based solutions to fight poverty and illustrate how firms exercise their Corporate Social Responsibility (CSR). Case A is positioned in December 2008, at a time when GDFL's model is clearly not performing. It gives an historical perspective on the joint-venture, and underlines the tension between the business' social and the economic aspects. Cases B and C are short follow-up cases designed to be distributed in class. , 2012 , Food company, poverty, nutritious food, social business, ethics, corporate social responsibility, marketing, corporate alliance, Bangladesh. , SnO (http://www.ccmp.fr/collection-hec-paris/cas-grameen-danone-food-limited-c-update)

Formation

  • Ph.D. in Management, Specialization in Marketing, INSEAD - France
  • M.Sc. in Management, INSEAD - France
  • Visitor, Tokyo University - Japon
  • Master of Business Administration, Harvard Business School - USA

Nominations académiques

Responsabilités académiques à HEC

  • 2019 Professeur Associé, mis en disponibilité, Marketing HEC Paris
  • 2008-2018 Professeur Associé, Marketing HEC Paris
  • 2008 Titulaire de la Chaire "Social Business / Entreprise et Pauvreté" HEC Paris
  • 2002-2007 Professeur Assistant HEC Paris
  • Spécialisation marketing ABA HEC Paris

Responsabilités académiques externes

  • 1994-2002 Adjunct Professor in Industrial Management Bordeaux Ecole de Management

Activités scientifiques

Adhésion à l'organisation académique ou professionnelle

  • Membre, Academy of Management
  • Membre, American Marketing Association
  • Membre du GERPISA (Groupe d'Etudes et de Recherche Permanent sur l'Industrie et les Salariés de l'Automobile)
  • Membre, Strategic Management Society
  • Administrateur de l'Association pour le Développement de la Recherche dans le Domaine de la Gestion des Entreprises (Harvard Business School - European Research Center)
  • Membre, INFORMS

Activités scientifiques

  • Rapporteur, International Journal of Research in Marketing
  • Rapporteur, European Management Review
  • Editorial Board Member : Journal of Business Market Management, Industrial Marketing Management
  • Rapporteur, Recherche et Application en Marketing
  • Rapporteur, European Marketing Academy Conference

  • Conference organisation

  • Organisation du symposium "The Inter-Organizational Communities of Practice (IOCoPs): New Insights and Knowledge Strategies", symposium co-sponsorisé par les divisions BPS et OMT, Academy of Management Conference, Hawaii.
  • Membre du comité d'organisation, Research workshop on Sustainability & Impact Challenges at the Base of the Pyramid, Ecole Polytechnique, ESSEC, HEC Paris
  • Prix ​​& honneurs

    Adhésion à l'organisation académique ou professionnelle

    • 2017 Prix Bruno Roux de Bézieux pour l’Initiative Pédagogique, conjointement avec L. Cochard, C. Renault, N. Dragonetti, E. Joujon, pour leur travail sur le programme « Commercial Academy » de LafargeHolcim ayant pour objectif d’aider les patrons pays, directeurs des ventes et directeurs marketing à transformer leur business unit en accélérant leur orientation clients. Ce programme a été entièrement co-construit avec l’entreprise et suivi en direct par un membre de son Comité de Direction.
    • 2015 Marketing Award at The Case Centre Awards and Competitions 2015 for 'Michelin Fleet Solutions: From Selling Tires to Selling Kilometers' (in coll. with C. Renault, W. Ulaga)
    • 2006 BNP Paribas Pierre Vernimmen Teaching Award
    • 2005 Prix ACA Bruel pour ma recherche sur la stratégie achats
    • 2002 HEC Fondation Research Prize
    • 2000 Winner, Institute for the Study of Business Markets (ISBM), Doctoral Dissertation Award Competition