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The numbers suggest the green investing ‘mega trend’ is here to stay

A study published in January by Augustin Landier of HEC Paris Business School, Jean-François Bonnefon of Toulouse School of Economics, and Parinitha Sastry and David Thesmar of MIT Sloan, showed that investors are willing to pay $0.7 more for a share in a company giving one more dollar per share to charity, writes CNBC. 

The study also revealed that firms exercising a negative social impact were valued at $0.9 less per share than those considered socially “neutral.”